The No-Backswing Swing: Brilliant or Marketing?

In this month's issue of Golf Magazine, Dr. Jim Suttie explains a new approach to the golf swing, one without a backswing. According to Suttie, eliminating the backswing reduces error by 70%, taking numerous problems of takeaway out of the equation.

While Golf heralds this swing a revolutionary, it is hardly new. In the January, 2002 issue of Golf Digest, the world's second best instructor, David Leadbetter, taught the same theory. Leadbetter felt the swing would be the swing of the future, especially with players getting stronger and stronger. Moreover, the move he advocates, including the pump Suttie explains, appears to be exactly the same as Golf Magazine's version.

Also, Ryan Moore actually put a modified version in play in late 2006. Moore, a former U.S. Amateur and NCAA Division 1 champion, felt it alleviated pressure on his injured wrist. The UNLV graduate had used a no-takeaway move in practice, but first instituted it at the now defunct 84 LUMBER Classic.

With the move never really catching on, it is easy to wonder whether this cover story may be simply a marketing tool against the other revolution, the stack and tilt. Only time will tell if Golf Magazine is really starting a swing revolution.

4 Response to "The No-Backswing Swing: Brilliant or Marketing?"

  1. Anonymous says:

    No backswing is a joke. At least with the stack and tilt, it just looks like you have a swing flaw.

    No backswing makes you look like you have a plate in your head.

    Agreed. I would feel much more comfortable playing in front of my buddies with the S&T.

    However, I did try the no backswing last year (way before it was "the revolution"), but didn't like it since it take so much practice to hit it sweet. If there is a range at the course you always play to warm up at, the swing may be right for you. Of course, there is nothing scarier if you have first tee jitters and have no idea if you are going to hit or miss the ball...

    Anonymous says:

    The only person with the plate in his head is the person who shoots down an idea just because it sounds or looks or is weird.

    Who CARES what it looks like.

    Who CARES what they say on the course.

    Does Jim Furyk care how he looks?

    I tried it, briefly, awhile ago and it felt pretty good. I think I 'll give it another chance and see how it fits. I'm more worried about how something will fit my game and less about how how I look doing it.

    If it works - and many, many people say it does for them - more power to 'em.

    t.j. says:

    Amen-- it is logical! This method "presets" the swing and eliminates any backswing errors. Just a matter of time until pros go with it.....

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